July 3, 2022

Publication and Presentation Roundup: A Look at Scholarly Work from College of Education Researchers from September-December, 2021

Faculty and research associates at the NC State College of Education, including its Belk Center for Community College Leadership and Research and Friday Institute for Educational Innovation, are publishing their research related to pressing educational topics in journals and sharing their work through national and international presentations. 

Take a look at a selection of presentations and publications from our faculty and research associates from October through December 2021 below.  

Editor’s note: The following list was compiled from information submitted by College of Education faculty and research associates. The list is divided into presentations and publications. Individual submissions are listed by date published or presented.

Publications

A Social Inquiry Analysis of Post-Pandemic Higher Education: A Futures Perspective

This article, authored by Professor Jayne Fleener, uses futures and social inquiry approaches to explore how post-pandemic times will impact higher education. Results indicate a need to rethink social metaphors for more equitable and desirable higher education futures. The article was published on Oct. 1, 2021, in the Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice

Describing the Experiences of Students with ADHD Learning Science Content with Emerging Technologies”

This study, co-authored by Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor Gail Jones, seeks to address the dearth in literature on neurodivergent students’ experiences with emerging technologies for learning science and describes the extent to which neurodivergent learners experiences the affordances of virtual learning environments for science learning as compared with neurotypical peers. The study was published on Oct. 1, 2021, in the Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

“Effectively communicating survey results”

This book chapter, authored by Belk Center Senior Research Associate Laura Maldonado, explores the best practices of communicating survey results by telling and visualizing a story. The chapter discusses how audience and venue should guide communication focus, explores six common models of communicating results, discusses strategies for visualization using tables, charts, infographics and dashboards, and provides guidelines about data visualization elements. The chapter was published on Oct. 1, 2021, as part of Basic Elements of Survey Research in Education: Addressing the Problems Your Advisor Never Told You About

From Words to Wisdom: Supporting Academic Language Use in PreK–3rd Grade

This book, co-authored by Assistant Professor Jill Grifenhagen, serves as a guide to show teachers how to introduce academic language to young children, with an emphasis on appreciating and leveraging linguistic diversity. The book was published on Oct. 1, 2021, by Teachers College Press

“Nationally representative evidence on the association between preschool and executive function skills in elementary school”

This study, authored by Assistant Professor Michael Little, examined the association between preschool attendance and executive function skills in each grade of elementary school. Results suggested small initial associations of preschool attendance with some subdomains of executive function, such as working memory. The article was published on Oct. 1, 2021, in AERA Open. 

The Impact of Prior Knowledge on the Effectiveness of Haptic and Visual Modalities for Teaching Forces

This article, co-authored by Associate Professor James Minogue, investigates the effects of a haptically-enhanced physics simulation on the understanding of the concept of buoyancy. Results suggest that the prior knowledge of users and the visual cues used impact the effectiveness of haptically-enhanced simulations with respect to learning outcomes. The article was published on Oct. 18, 2021, in Proceedings of the 2021 International Conference on Multimodal Interaction

What’s Fair is Fair: Detecting and Mitigating Encoded Bias in Multimodal Models of Museum Visitor Attention”

This article, co-authored by Associate Professor James Minogue, investigates bias detection and mitigation techniques to address issues of algorithmic fairness in multimodal models of museum visitor visual attention and measures the effectiveness of two different debiasing strategies when applied to trained multimodal visitor attention models. The article was published on Oct. 18, 2021, in Proceedings of the 2021 International Conference on Multimodal Interaction. 

“Getting KnERDI with Language: Examining Teachers’ Knowledge for Enhancing Reading Development in Code-Based and Meaning-Based Domains”

This article, authored by Associate Professor Dennis Davis, Assistant Professor Jill Grifenhagen, Assistant Professor Jackie Relyea and doctoral students Courtney Saumelson and Robyn Delaco, outlines the development of the Knowledge for Enhancing Reading Development Inventory (KnERDI), an instrument to measure teachers’ knowledge in alphabetic code/word reading and meaning/connected text processes. The study was published on Oct. 19, 2021, in Reading Research Quarterly

Interactional production of deficit talk in a professional development for mathematics teachers

This paper, authored by Assistant Professor Sunghwan Byun, examines deficit talk in an equity-oriented professional development setting. Findings suggest that mathematics teacher educators need to attend to the micropolitical nature of deficit talk and their participation in the production of deficit talk as they formulate ways to respond to it in professional development interactions. The article was published on Oct. 25, 2021, in The Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

Online Learning in Mathematics Education

This book, edited by Associate Dean for Research and Innovation Karen Hollebrands, Assistant Professor Robin Anderson, and Professor Kevin Oliver, brings together research from mathematics education and instructional design to describe the development and impact of online environments on prospective and practicing teachers’ learning to teach mathematics. The book was published on Oct. 28, 2021, by Springer International Publishing

How Use-Modify-Create Brings Middle Grades Students To Computational Thinking

This article, co-authored by Jennifer Houchins, director of technology programs at the Friday Institute, and Eric Wiebe, a professor and a senior research fellow with the Friday Institute, chronicles the efforts of an interdisciplinary team of researchers as they collaborated with middle grades science teachers and students to build and refine an epidemic disease curriculum model. The paper was published on Nov. 1, 2021, in the International Journal of Designs for Learning

“Bridging human and machine scoring in experimental assessments of writing: tools, tips, and lessons learned from a field trial in education”

This working paper, co-authored by Assistant Professor Jackie Relyea, proposes several different methods for supplementary analysis of randomized trial data and presents a case study of using these methods to enrich an evaluation of a classroom intervention on young children’s writing. The study was published on Nov. 19, 2021, by the Annenberg Institute at Brown University.

“‘I Never Learned More in My Life in Such a Short Period of Time:’ Math Contextualization as Momentum toward Community College Student Success”

This article, co-authored by Brett Ranon Nachman, a postdoctoral scholar at the Belk Center, explores community college students’ learning experiences in contextualized math classes and how those experiences shape momentum toward success. The study offers empirical evidence on the potential of contextualization to enhance community college students’ learning experiences and success in math. The article was published on Nov. 21, 2021, in the Community College Journal of Research and Practice

Investigation of the relationships among science teachers’ epistemic orientations, epistemic understanding, and implementation of Next Generation Science Standards science practices”

This article, authored by Professor Soonhye Park and several doctoral students, examines the relationships between secondary science teachers’ epistemic orientations and their understanding and self-reported implementation of the science practices described in the U.S. Next Generation Science Standards. Results indicated that teacher participation in Next Generation Science Standards professional development programs significantly predicted their implementation of science practices. The article was published on Nov. 26, 2021, in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching

Faith and FACES: Black Parents’ Perceptions of Autism, Faith, and Coping”

This article, authored by Assistant Professor Jamie Pearson, highlights the perceptions of Black parents raising children with autism on mental health and religious coping within the contexts of a parent advocacy intervention efficacy study. The article was published on Nov. 29, 2021, in Exceptional Children. 

Building a computational model of food webs: Impacts on middle school students’ computational and systems thinking skills”

This article, authored by doctoral student Arif Rachmatullah ‘21 and Professor and Friday Institute Senior Research Fellow Eric Wiebe examines the impacts of paper-based pictorial and computational modeling activities on students’ systems thinking and computational thinking skills. Results revealed significant increases in the systems thinking-embedded constructs. The paper was published on Nov. 30, 2021, in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching

“How teachers and leaders facilitate integration in a two-way dual language immersion program”

This case study, authored by Assistant Professor Jenn Ayscue, examines the two-way dual-language immersion (TWI) program at a rural elementary school and finds that the program provides an opportunity to facilitate integration among students from different racial and linguistic backgrounds. The article was published on Dec. 1, 2021, in Teachers College Record

“Preparing educators for culturally responsive teaching through technical cultural representations”

This article, authored by Professor Kevin Oliver and Associate Professor Angela Wiseman, describes a professional development program designed to prepare in-service educators for culturally responsive teaching through practice with the development of technical representations of cultural themes in an international context. Findings suggest that the program has been successful in helping most educators learn new technologies and strategies for cultural representation with writing frames and global projects. The article was published on Dec. 1, 2021, in the Journal of Applied Instructional Design

Conceptualizing Digital Campus Climate within LGBTQ+ Resource Center Websites: A Critical Discourse Analysis”

This article, co-authored by Brett Ranon Nachman, a postdoctoral scholar at the Belk Center, leverages the Campus Pride index to understand how institutional webpages align with best practices and convey a richer understanding of digital campus climate. Findings illustrate the burden LGBTQ+ resource centers undertake as they work to serve their campus communities through intentional partnerships and institutional policies to support LGBTQ+ communities. The article was published on Dec. 2, 2021, in Innovative Higher Education

“Going the distance: Using Flipgrid to mediate race discussions across two young adult literature courses”

This article, co-authored by Assistant Professor Michelle Falter, examines the discursive moves that pre-service teachers made when engaging in discussions on racial injustice through Flipgrid. Findings show that pre-service teachers believe Flipgrid provides the right balance of proximity and distance in order to see the issues in new ways and collaborating across locations and universities provides a needed alternative perspectives for all and solidarity for some. The article was published on Dec. 4, 2021, in Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE).

Supporting Interactive Storytelling with Block-Based Narrative Programming

This article, co-authored by Associate Professor James Minogue, Professor Kevin Oliver and several College of Education doctoral students, presents an approach to block-based programming for interactive digital storytelling to engage upper elementary students in computational thinking and narrative skill development. The article was published on Dec. 4, 2021, in the International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling

“The intersection of perceptions of classroom openness with civic engagement among young urban adolescents in science classroom”

This study, co-authored by Assistant Professor Jackie Relyea, examined the extent to which student perceptions of classroom openness and personal characteristics were associated with civic engagement. Results showed that student perceptions of classroom openness uniquely predicted the personally responsible type of citizenship. The article was published on Dec. 6, 2021, in Applied Developmental Science

“Principal Candidates’ Reflective Learning During a Full-Time Internship”

This study, authored by Assistant Professor Tim Drake, explores how principal candidates made sense of their internship by analyzing weekly reflections during a school year. Findings show that candidates’ views of leadership developed from viewing leadership through a lens of making decisions and providing direction and through recognizing that much of the work of a school leader came from building relationships and delegating leadership responsibilities. The study was published on Dec. 9, 2021, in the Journal of Research on Leadership Education.

“Academic vocabulary instruction and socio-scientific issue discussion in urban sixth-grade classrooms”

This study, authored by Assistant Professor Jackie Relyea, aimed to design and evaluate the effectiveness of a literacy-science integrated program that emphasized the incorporation of academic vocabulary instruction and collaborative discussion of a socio-scientific issue in sixth-grade science classrooms in an urban school. Results show students who participated in the intervention had significantly higher academic vocabulary knowledge and scientific argumentation scores. The study was published on Dec. 10, 2021, in the Journal of Educational Research

“Preparing pre-service early childhood teachers to support child language development”

This study, authored by Assistant Professor Jill Grifenhagen, examines seven pre-service teachers’ knowledge of, perspectives on and strategies for facilitating language development as they engaged in traditional course content and assignments and explored sociocultural influences on language, participated in practical experiences, videotaped and reflected on their work with preschool children and engaged in coaching and feedback. The study was published on Dec. 12, 2021, in the Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education

“Assessing computational thinking in the social studies”

This article, authored by Associate Professor Meghan Manfra, develops an understanding of the manner with which student understanding of computational thinking emerged in a classroom. Findings show that, through integration of carefully designed, learner-centric tasks, students came to view computational thinking as an approach to analyzing data and solving problems. The article was published on Dec. 14, 2021, in Theory & Research in Social Education.

“Program-wide implementation of the Pyramid Model: Supporting fidelity at the program and classroom levels”

This study, co-authored by Assistant Professor Lam Pham, tests the Program-Wide Supports for Pyramid Model Implementation intervention and examines its feasibility of implementation in community-based early childhood programs that serve students from low-income environments. Findings indicate the approach is effective, although more time and support is necessary to sustain implementation and produce robust effects on children. The paper was published on Dec. 14, 2021, in Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 

“From Alternative Facts to Tentative Truths: Towards a Post-postmodern Dialogic Epistemology”

This article, authored by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, seeks to reflect on the role of adult education in addressing the epistemic crisis, arguing for the need to develop a new shared epistemic basis in the form of a post-postmodern dialog epistemology. The article was published on Dec. 15, 2021, in Adult Education Critical Issues

Adult Learning in a Migration Society

This book, edited by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, highlights individual stories of migrants, showcases innovative research methods and explores concepts and theories that might be usefully applied toward learning needs in a migration society. The book was published on Dec. 20, 2021, by Routledge

“School ethnic–racial socialization and adolescent ethnic–racial identity

This article, co-authored by Associate Professor Christy Byrd, examined the relationship between ethnic-racial socialization and ethnic-racial identity, finding that the perceptions of opportunities to learn about one’s ethnic-racial background and messages about American values are positively associated with youths’ exploration of and commitment to their identities across multiple racial groups. The study was published on Dec. 23, 2021, in Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology.

“Unpacking school ethnic-racial socialization in context”

This article, authored by Associate Professor Christy Byrd, proposes a conceptual model that outlines the transmitters, methods and content of school ethnic-racial socialization (ERS) as well as how school ERS can influence adolescent outcomes. The article was published on Dec. 25, 2021, in the Journal of Social Issues.

“Addressing Workload Equity: Seven Strategies for Chairs”

This article, co-authored by W. Dallas Herring Professor and Belk Center Executive Director Audrey Jaeger, describes the work of the Faculty Workload and Rewards Project and offers advice to chairs about how to engage their department in the process of strategic, equity-minded reform. The article was published on Dec. 28, 2021, in The Department Chair

“Who Leads Turnaround Schools? Characteristics of Principals in Tennessee’s Achievement School District and Innovation Zones”

This article, co-authored by Assistant Professor Lam Pham, examines the personal demographics, experience, educational background, prior school performance, salaries and turnover of principals who led two turnaround models in Tennessee’s lowest performing schools.  The article was published on Dec. 29, 2021, in Educational Administration Quarterly.

Presentations

At-Home Learning (AHL): Production in a pandemic

This presentation, co-delivered by Friday Institute Research Associate Marie Himes, focuses on the At-Home Learning Initiative, which produced 96 state standards-aligned episodes featuring North Carolina teachers and content from partners to address gaps in remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The presentation was delivered on Oct. 20, 2021, during the virtual PBS Technology Conference. 

Teaching Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global during a pandemic in the United States: Lessons learned

This presentation, delivered by Associate Dean and Friday Institute Executive Director Hiller Spires, Friday Institute Research Associate Marie Himes and doctoral student Jessica Eagle, shared findings from the examination of the Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global learning approach that showed remote learning affected student motivation. Discussion focused on an integrated view of what students gained and did not gain from the PBI Global experience as related to new learning ecology. The presentation was delivered on Oct. 26, 2021, during the Ireland International Conference on Education, which was held virtually. 

Community of inquiry presences in newly remote online courses: A college-wide self study

This conference proceeding, co-delivered by Professor Kevin Oliver, synthesizes survey results from 65 instructors and 70 students to determine how effectively newly remote courses in a large college of education supported social, cognitive and teaching presences during remote learning. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 5, 2021, during the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois. 

Iterative design of a narrative-centered learning environment for computationally-rich science learning in elementary school

This conference proceeding, co-presented by Professor Kevin Oliver and Associate Professor James Minogue, shares the iterative design process for a narrative-centered learning environment that integrates science learning, computational thinking and digital storytelling. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 5, 2021, during the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois. 

Linguistic analytics of mobile texting on study abroad: Toward enhanced culturally-reflective dialogue

This conference proceeding, delivered by Professor Kevin Oliver, presents the findings of a linguistic analysis of WhatsApp text messages sent between 40 American teachers who were participating in a study abroad program in the Czech Republic. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 5, 2021, during the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois.

The struggle to imagine: Fanfiction & restorying the imagination gap

This presentation, co-delivered by Assistant Professor Michelle Falter, was designed to help teachers leverage the restorying power of fanfiction to help students write themselves into the stories they want to see. The presentation was given on Nov. 5, 2021, at the North Carolina English Teachers Association Conference in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Visualizing Collaborative Learning

This presentation, delivered by Assistant Professor Shiyan Jiang, discussed how to visualize dynamic and complex collaborative learning processes using the StoryQ project as an example. Jiang described a visualization pipeline for qualitative research, with a special focus on a qualitative analysis of high school students’ processes of building machine learning models. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 5, 2021, as part of NC State Libraries ongoing Coffee and Viz series. 

Supporting students’ science content knowledge through Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global within a rural/urban school context in the United States

This presentation, delivered by Associate Dean and Friday Institute Executive Director Hiller Spires, Friday Institute Research Associate Marie Himes, and Assistant Professor Erin Krupa, examined how ninth grade students from one rural and one urban high school in the southeastern U.S. engaged in a collaborative inquiry process, Project-Based Inquiry (PBI) Global and shared how engagement in PBI Global affected students’ science content knowledge and motivation for learning. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 8, 2021, during the 2nd International Conference on Science and Technology Education, which was held virtually. 

Leadership in a Context-Driven School Improvement Model: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of North Carolina’s Restart Program

This presented paper, delivered by Assistant Professor Lam Pham, explores the decision-making process of and influences on principals in a flexible reform model. Findings suggest that multiple factors inform, limit and increase principals’ ability to plan for and implement reform. The paper was delivered on Nov. 11, 2021, during the annual convention of the University Council for Educational Administration, which was held virtually. 

Interns’ Reflective Learning During a Full-Time Principal Internship

This presentation, delivered by Assistant Professor Tim Drake, explores how principal candidates made sense of their internship by analyzing their weekly reflections during a school year. Findings show that candidates’ views of leadership developed from viewing leadership through a lens of making decisions and providing direction and through recognizing that much of the work of a school leader came from building relationships and delegating leadership responsibilities. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 13, 2021, during the UCEA Annual Conference in Columbus, Ohio.

AeroEducate: Aeronautics-Themed Activity Development for STEM Education

This presented paper, delivered by Assistant Teaching Professor Kevin Sutton,  provides an overview of how multiple agencies collaborated with industry partners to develop resources and the AeroEducate website and shares some materials available to students and educators through the platform. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 18, 2021, during the Mississippi Valley Technology Teacher Education Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. 

Expectancy-Value Theory within “Making & Doing” in a Technology, Engineering, and Design Education Fabrication Space

This presentation, delivered by Assistant Teaching Professor Steven Miller and doctoral student Justin Egresitz, presents preliminary insights from a pilot study investigating undergraduate motivation for making and doing across three sections of a making and doing-centered technology course. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 18, 2021, during the Mississippi Valley Technology Teacher Education Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. 

Transformative Learning as a Metatheory

This guest lecture, given by Associate Professor Chad Hoggan, addresses the issue of transformative learning theory being increasingly used to refer to almost any instance of learning and offers several points of clarity to resolve the problem. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 19, 2021, at the Pädagogische Hochschule Freiburg in Germany, on Dec. 3, 2021, at Duke Kunshan University in China and on Dec. 17, 2021, at Aeres University of Applied Science in The Netherlands. 

CTE instructors’ level of preparedness to transition to distance learning and perceived student outcomes achieved during the spring 2020 semester

This poster presentation, led by Associate Teaching Professor Michelle Bartlett, explored the perceptions and preparedness levels of career and technical education (CTE) teachers from all 50 states as they transitioned to distance learning and their perceived student achievement outcomes. The poster was presented on Nov. 28, 2021, during the Career and Technical Education Research and Professional Development Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Impacts of a national fellowship on postsecondary career & technical education research

This presentation from Associate Professor James Bartlett, Associate Teaching Professor Michelle Bartlett and ECMC Foundation Postsecondary CTE Research Fellows Program Coordinator Jordan Dolfi, examines participants’ experiences in a year-long national research fellowship in career and technical education research, describing fellows’ perspectives on the impact of the fellowship experience and their development as career and technical education (CTE) researchers. The presentation was delivered on Nov. 28, 2021, during the Career and Technical Education Research and Professional Development Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Intended outcomes & beyond: Outputs, experiences & reflections from a national fellowship on postsecondary career & technical education research

This symposium, led by Associate Professor James Bartlett, Associate Teaching Professor Michelle Bartlett and ECMC Foundation Postsecondary CTE Research Fellows Program Coordinator Jordan Dolfi, describes a research fellows program that seeks to develop researchers studying postsecondary career and technical education and includes fellows describing their experiences and collaborations during the program.  The symposium was held on Nov. 28, 2021, during the Career and Technical Education Research and Professional Development Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Writing the path to success: Supporting CTE postdoctoral researchers and graduate students through virtual writing sessions 

This poster presentation from ECMC Foundation Postsecondary CTE Research Fellows Program Coordinator Jordan Dolfi, Belk Center Senior Research Associate Laura Maldonado, Associate Professor James Bartlett, and Associate Teaching Professor Michelle Bartlett, seeks to uncover the perspectives of graduate students and recent graduates involved in an online writing series for research fellows in the Postsecondary Career and Technical Education Research Fellows program during the 2020-21 academic year. The poster was presented on Nov. 28, 2021, during the Career and Technical Education Research and Professional Development Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Building an effective virtual mentoring program for CTE instructors

This presentation, co-delivered by Associate Teaching Professor Michelle Bartlett and Belk Center Faculty Scholar Carrol Warren, shares the implementation of a virtual mentoring program for community college career and technical  education (CTE) faculty that paired them with experienced online educators for support and offered hands-on disciplines in moving programs online. The presentation was delivered on Dec. 1, 2021, during the Association for Career and Technical Education CareerTech VISION 2021 conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Integrating labor market data in administering high-quality CTE programs

This presentation, delivered by Associate Professor James Bartlett and Associate Teaching Professor Michelle Bartlett, provides a sample of labor market data and information and provides examples of how to use it practically in order to make data-based decisions to strengthen career and technical education (CTE) programs. The presentation was delivered on Dec. 1, 2021, during the Association for Career and Technical Education CareerTech VISION 2021 conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.

“Exist[ing] in the margins” but “deserv[ing] better than that”: Black girl representations in 19 young adult texts

This article presentation, delivered by Assistant Professor Michelle Falter, looks at the representation of Black girlhood and womanhood in young adult literature through a critical content analysis of 19 texts featuring Black main characters. The presentation was delivered on Dec. 1, 2021, during the 71st Literacy Research Association Annual Conference in Atlanta, Georgia.

“I like it, I think”: Successes and challenges of remote, early-literacy instruction

This presentation, delivered by Assistant Professor Jill Grifenhagen and Assistant Teaching Professor Jill Jones, describes the nature of early literacy instructional practice by primary grade teachers in rural settings and draws on interviews to gain understanding of teachers’ perspectives on remote early literacy instruction. The presentation was delivered on Dec. 1, 2021, during the annual meeting of the Literacy Research Association in Atlanta, Georgia.

I am not a teacher just yet, however…”: Preservice Teachers’ Discursive Engagement in an Online Literacy Professional Development Course

This paper, presented by Friday Institute Research Associate Sarah Bausell and Associate Dean and Friday Institute Executive Director Hiller Spires, explores how pre-service teachers in search of alternative fieldwork and observation opportunities during the 2020-21 academic year engaged in a 10-hour, online literacy professional development course called “Teaching K-8 English Language Learners Academic and Literacy Content.” The presentation was delivered on Dec. 3, 2021, during the Literacy Research Association Annual Meeting, which was held virtually. 

Using composite narratives to explore community college involvement in SkillsUSAThis presentation, delivered by Belk Center Senior Research Associate Laura Maldonado, explores the involvement of community college students in a career and technical student organization and shares first-person narratives of involvement in professional development, competitive events, community service and skills activities offered through SkillsUSA. The presentation was delivered on Dec. 8, 2021, during the Career and Technical Education Research and Professional Development Conference, which was held virtually.